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  1. The Progressive People's Party (German: Fortschrittliche Volkspartei, FVP) was a social liberal party of the late German Empire. History. It was formed on 6 March 1910 as a merger of Free-minded People's Party, Free-minded Union and German People's Party in order to unify various fragmented liberal groups represented in parliament.

    • 20 November 1918; 103 years ago
    • Otto Fischbeck (1910–1912), Otto Wiemer (1912–1918)
  2. Category:Progressive People's Party (Germany) politicians Wikimedia Commons has media related to Members of Fortschrittliche Volkspartei. Germany portal Biography portal Politics portal Pages in category "Progressive People's Party (Germany) politicians" The following 23 pages are in this category, out of 23 total.

  3. The German Progress Party ( German: Deutsche Fortschrittspartei, DFP) was the first modern political party in Germany, founded by liberal members of the Prussian House of Representatives ( Abgeordnetenhaus) in 1861 in opposition to Minister President Otto von Bismarck .

    • 6 June 1861; 161 years ago
    • Centre-left
  4. 13. Dez. 2021 · The Progressive People's Party (German: Fortschrittliche Volkspartei, FVP) was a social liberal party of the late German Empire. History . It was formed on 6 March 1910 as a merger of Free-minded People's Party, Free-minded Union and German People's Party in order to unify various fragmented liberal groups represented in parliament.

    • Origins
    • Dominance in The 1870s
    • Decline
    • Allies of Big Business
    • World War I
    • See Also
    • References and Further Reading

    A first national liberal parliamentary group arose among right-wing deputies of the liberal German Progress Party in the Prussian House of Representatives during a constitutional conflict sparked by Minister President Otto von Bismarck: In 1862, he had overruled the Liberal opposition in parliament using the so-called Lückentheorie ("Gap Theory") t...

    The National Liberals' period of great dominance was between 1871 and 1879, when they were Bismarck's chief allies in the Reichstag where they were avid supporters of the anti-Catholic Kulturkampf measures and the Anti-Socialist Laws. In the first all-German federal election held on 3 March 1871, the party reached 30.1% of the votes, becoming the s...

    In 1879, Bismarck's alliance with the National Liberals broke over his abandonment of free trade by the adoption of a tariff. In the economic crisis following the Panic of 1873, several lobbying associations exerted pressure on Bismarck who increasingly favoured a more protectionist approach. However, these policies violated the liberal principles ...

    The National Liberals came to be closely associated with the interests of big business, maintaining strong relations with mighty industrialist advocacy groups as well as with imperialist and nationalist associations like the Pan-German League. Increasingly threatened by the growing strength of the Social Democrats, the party gradually became more c...

    During World War I, most of the National Liberals, including such leaders of their left-wing as Gustav Stresemann, avidly supported the expansionist goals of the imperial government, although they also called for reform at home. Following the war, the party broke up. Stresemann led the main body of the party, including most of its moderate and cons...

    Anderson, Margaret Lavinia. "Voter, Junker, Landrat, Priest: The Old Authorities and the New Franchise in Imperial Germany," American Historical Review (1993) 98#5 pp. 1448–1474 in JSTOR.
    Anderson, Margaret Lavinia. Practicing democracy: Elections and political culture in Imperial Germany(2000).
    Dorpalen, Andreas. "Emperor Frederick III and the German Liberal Movement," American Historical Review (1948) 54#1 pp. 1–31 in JSTOR.
    Gross, Michael B. "Kulturkampf and unification: German liberalism and the war against the Jesuits." Central European History 30#4 (1997): 545-566. in JSTOR.