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  1. Charles Hodge (December 27, 1797 – June 19, 1878) was a Reformed Presbyterian theologian and principal of Princeton Theological Seminary between 1851 and 1878. He was a leading exponent of the Princeton Theology, an orthodox Calvinist theological tradition in America during the 19th century.

  2. Charles Hodge war ein US-amerikanischer Theologe der Presbyterianischen Kirche und 1822 bis 1877 Professor am Princeton Theological Seminary der Princeton University.

  3. Charles Hodge (born Dec. 27, 1797, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.—died June 19, 1878, Princeton, N.J.) was a conservative American biblical scholar and a leader of the “Princeton School” of Reformed, or Calvinist, theology.

  4. 27. Dez. 2016 · Some called Hodge the “Pope of Presbyterianism.” Hodge’s stature in American religious history has faded, obscured by figures from his era with more dubious legacies, including the evangelist Charles Finney, and Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism.

  5. 11. Mai 2011 · A review of Paul Gutjahr's biography of Charles Hodge, a prominent Reformed theologian and professor at Princeton Theological Seminary. The review praises the book's readability and insight, but criticizes its brevity, lack of citations, and misleading claim on inerrancy.

  6. Charles Hodge’s American context and Reformed identity illustrate the persistence and change of Reformed ideas in nineteenth century America. Self-consciously, he sought to defend and transmit Reformed orthodoxy into an American context.

  7. Hodge was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on the 28th of December 1797. He graduated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton) in 1815, and in 1819 at the Princeton Theological seminary, where he became an instructor in 1820, and the first professor of Oriental and Biblical literature in 1822.