Yahoo Suche Web Suche

Suchergebnisse

  1. Suchergebnisse:
  1. Ernest Gustav Liebold (* 16. März 1884 in Detroit; † 4. März 1956 ebenda) war ein amerikanischer Bankenvorstand. Er wurde ein enger Vertrauter und Sekretär des Industriellen Henry Ford und übernahm die Verwaltung von dessen Privatvermögen.

  2. Ernest G. Liebold (March 16, 1884 – March 4, 1956) was the business representative and personal secretary of Henry Ford. A fervent antisemite, he took an active part in the antisemitic campaign conducted by the industrialist's weekly newspaper, The Dearborn Independent, from 1920 to 1927.

  3. Summary. Ernest Liebold served as Henry Ford's executive secretary from 1913 to 1933. He administered nearly all of Mr. Ford's personal business outside of Ford Motor Company. Liebold handled Mr. Ford's correspondence, paid his bills, and managed many of his special projects.

  4. The papers are comprised of copied documents that Liebold offered the Ford Motor Company Archives after he was interviewed by Ford Archives staff as part of an oral history program conducted in the 1950s. The only original material in the collection are bank books dated 1918-1927 which Liebold kept as treasurer of the Dearborn Publishing ...

  5. 5. Nov. 2021 · Die Texte gingen meist auf Gespräche mit seinem Privatsekretär Ernest G. Liebold zurück, die dann der Chefredakteur des Wochenblattes, William John Cameron, als sein Ghostwriter niederschrieb.

    • Geschichte
    • Leitender Redakteur Geschichte
    • Ernest G. Liebold1
    • Ernest G. Liebold2
    • Ernest G. Liebold3
    • Ernest G. Liebold4
    • Ernest G. Liebold5
  6. Ernest Gustav Liebold war ein amerikanischer Bankenvorstand. Er wurde ein enger Vertrauter und Sekretär des Industriellen Henry Ford und übernahm die Verwaltung von dessen Privatvermögen. In dieser Funktion koordinierte er Fords geschäftliche Unternehmungen außerhalb der Ford Motor Company. Zwischen 1913 und 1933 war er die Person mit dem ...

  7. Ernest G. Liebold was interviewed in 1951 by Ford Archives staff member Owen Bombard as part of the Archives' oral history program. At that time he permitted copies to be made of several groups of his personal papers dating from 1906 through 1951. Other papers were offered but not copied.