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  1. Two national Freedom Trains have toured the United States: the 1947–49 special exhibit Freedom Train and the 1975–76 American Freedom Train which celebrated the United States Bicentennial. Each train had its own special red, white and blue paint scheme and its own itinerary and route across the 48 contiguous states, stopping to visitors and displaying Americana and related historical ...

  2. By U.S. National Archives. The Freedom Train. The Freedom Train was a seven-car train that traveled across the United States from September 1947 until January 1949. It was dedicated to the...

  3. The American Freedom Train (AFT) was a 26-car train led by one of three enormous steam engines restored just for the occasion. Over a 21 month period from April 1, 1975 to December 31, 1976 more than 7 million Americans visited the train during its tour of all 48 contiguous states.

  4. 26. Nov. 2017 · Ted Widmer writes about segregation, the Truman Presidency, and the Freedom Train, a mobile exhibit of Americana that travelled by rail, beginning in 1947.

  5. Why a Freedom Train? - the train's purpose in 1947 America. Giving Wheels to the Dream - railroad equipment logistics. Specialized Personnel - maintaining the train. The Train's Journey Across America - statistics, milestones. U.S. Marines: The Train's Proud Staff - their vital role.

  6. The Freedom Train served as an early effort to unite the American people against the threat of communism. Carrying over 130 pieces of U.S. history ranging from documents to flags, the Freedom Train reached 3.5 million people across the United States. During its journey, the Freedom Train stopped in three hundred communities. While the train was ...

  7. 19. Sept. 2017 · The Freedom Train and the Contagion of Liberty, 1947-1949. September 19, 2017 by ncurrie, posted in Anniversary, Civil Rights, Civil Rights Protest & Issues, World War II Era. Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park. Late in 1946, Attorney General Tom Clark, concerned ...