Yahoo Suche Web Suche

Suchergebnisse

  1. Suchergebnisse:
  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › HerpyllisHerpyllis - Wikipedia

    Herpyllis of Stagira ( Greek: Ἑρπυλλίς) was Aristotle 's companion and lover after his wife, Pythias, died. It is unclear whether she was a free woman (as it appears in the surviving Greek version of Aristotle's will) or a servant (as in the Arabic version). [1]

  2. de.wikipedia.org › wiki › PythiasPythias – Wikipedia

    Pythias ( altgriechisch Πυθιάς Pythiás) war die Frau des Philosophen Aristoteles . Sie war eine Verwandte des Hermias, der die Städte Assos und Atarneus an der kleinasiatischen Küste gegenüber der Insel Lesbos beherrschte und mit Aristoteles befreundet war. Hermias war ein Gegner der Perser und mit Makedonien verbündet.

  3. Die Frau von Aristoteles war Pythias; sie war eine Verwandte seines Freundes Hermias und mit Aristoteles verheiratet. Zusammen hatten sie eine Tochter, welche auch Pythias hieß. Als seine erste Frau starb, wurde Herpyllis die neue Frau von Aristoteles. Sie war jedoch niedriger Herkunft.

  4. 15. Sept. 2023 · Herpyllis is the 2nd wife of Aristotle. His 1st wife was Phytias. After she died Herpylles became his wife. Herpylles and Aristotle had a son named after Aristotle's father Nicomachus.

  5. Pythias war die Frau des Philosophen Aristoteles. Sie war eine Verwandte des Hermias, der die Städte Assos und Atarneus an der kleinasiatischen Küste gegenüber der Insel Lesbos beherrschte und mit Aristoteles befreundet war. Hermias war ein Gegner der Perser und mit Makedonien verbündet.

  6. Nicomacheas was born to Pythia or Herpyllis, his second wife. In 335 Aristotle returned to Athens, where he lectured at the Lyceum for twelve or thirteen years. In his lifetime Aristotle had many detractors. The alleged personal conflict with Plato is without foundation. It seems clear that Aristotle did not build the Lyceum in

  7. According to Timaeus, he had a son by Herpyllis, his concubine, who was also called Nicomachus. [2] He seceded from the Academy while Plato was still alive. Hence the remark attributed to the latter: "Aristotle spurns me, as colts kick out at the mother who bore them."