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  1. A final fleet action was planned for the end of October 1918, days before the Armistice was to take effect. The bulk of the High Seas Fleet was to have sortied from their base in Wilhelmshaven to engage the British Grand Fleet; Scheer—by now the Grand Admiral (Grossadmiral) of the fleet—intended to inflict as much damage as possible on the British navy, in order to retain a better ...

  2. 5 torpedo-boats sunk. (62,300 tons sunk) [1] The Battle of Jutland ( German: Skagerrakschlacht, the Battle of the Skagerrak) was a naval battle between Britain's Royal Navy Grand Fleet, under Admiral Sir John Jellicoe, and the Imperial German Navy 's High Seas Fleet, under Vice-Admiral Reinhard Scheer, during World War I.

  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Kiel_mutinyKiel mutiny - Wikipedia

    The Kiel mutiny (German: Kieler Matrosenaufstand) was a revolt by sailors of the German High Seas Fleet against the maritime military command in Kiel.The mutiny broke out on 3 November 1918 when some of the ships' crews refused to sail out from Wilhelmshaven for the final battle against the British Grand Fleet that the Admiralty had ordered without the knowledge or approval of the German ...

  4. Jutland, Battle of. On 31 May/1 June 1916 the British Grand Fleet and the German High Sea Fleet clashed at Jutland. It was the largest naval battle in history until the Battle of Leyte Gulf off the Philippines in 1944, involving 151 British and ninety-one German warships. Although the German vessels inflicted heavier losses upon its enemies ...

  5. Location in the North Sea. The action of 19 August 1916 was one of two attempts in 1916 by the German High Seas Fleet to engage elements of the British Grand Fleet, following the mixed results of the Battle of Jutland, during the First World War. The lesson of Jutland for Germany had been the vital need for reconnaissance, to avoid the ...

  6. Ludwig von Reuter. Hans Hermann Ludwig von Reuter (9 February 1869 – 18 December 1943) was a German admiral who commanded the High Seas Fleet when it was interned at Scapa Flow in the north of Scotland at the end of World War I. On 21 June 1919 he ordered the scuttling of the German fleet in Scapa Flow to prevent the UK from seizing the ships.

  7. The strategic and intellectual bankruptcy of the High Seas Fleet concept isn't really covered. While the problems with the concept up to 1906 are covered nicely, this analysis isn't taken forward. This strategy was a key factor in Britain becoming involved in World War I (and contributed to the tensions which caused the war), yet due to geography and Britain's shipbuilding capabilities never ...