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  1. James Dunwoody Bulloch (June 25, 1823 – January 7, 1901) was the Confederacy's chief foreign agent in Great Britain during the American Civil War. Based in Liverpool, he operated blockade runners and commerce raiders that provided the Confederacy with its only source of hard currency.

    • 1839–1854 USN, 1861–1865 CSN
  2. 29. März 2003 · James Dunwoody Bulloch, the primary naval agent of the Confederacy in Europe, oversaw the building of several ships designed to ruin Northern shipping during the Union blockade of the South during the Civil War. Born to a prominent Georgia family associated with historic Bulloch Hall in Roswell, Bulloch was the uncle of Theodore ...

  3. Although Confederate commander James D. Bulloch had a well-rounded naval background, he also proved skillful as a secret agent. His talents were dearly valued for their efficacy in England, from whence the fledgling Confederacy hoped to secure ships for the navy it would need to survive.

  4. 7. Jan. 2021 · The U.S. State Department called James Dunwoody Bulloch, the Confederacy’s spymaster in Britain, the most dangerous man in Europe. (Alamy Stock Photo) As the Confederacy’s European spymaster, Bulloch had a breadth of duties, including buying civilian ships and reconfiguring them into commerce raiders, like CSS Alabama, to prey on Union shipping.

  5. James Dunwoody Bulloch was born on the 25th June 1823 near Savannah, Georgia, the only child of Major James Stephens Bulloch and Esther Amarintha Elliot. He married Elizabeth Caskie in 1851....

  6. James Dunwoody Bulloch (June 25, 1823 – January 7, 1901) was the Confederacy 's chief foreign agent in Great Britain during the American Civil War. Based in Liverpool, he operated blockade runners and commerce raiders that provided the Confederacy with its only source of hard currency.

  7. James Dunwoody Bulloch 387 tinues, "I had never concealed or ever disguised the fact that in respect to the issues at stake my heart and my head were with the South. My sympathies and convictions were both on that side, although my personal interests were ...