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  1. History of Germany. Jump to navigation Jump to search. This ... Weimar Republic: 1918–1933: Nazi Germany: 1933–1945: World War II: 1939–1945: Contemporary Germany. Occupation ; Ostgebiete; 1945–1949/1952: Expulsion of Germans: 19 ...

  2. 04.12.2017 · Weimar Germany, 1918/19–1933 The Constitution of the German Empire of August 11, 1919 (Weimar Constitution). German History in Documents and Images. Weimar Republic.

  3. Early film theorists in Germany began to write about the significance of Schaulust, or "visual pleasure", for the audience, including the Dada movement writer Walter Serner: "If one looks to where cinema receives its ultimate power, into these strangely flickering eyes that point far back into human history, suddenly it stands there in all its massiveness: visual pleasure."

  4. The history of the Jews in Germany goes back at least to the year 321, and continued through the Early Middle Ages (5th to 10th centuries CE) and High Middle Ages (circa 1000–1299 CE) when Jewish immigrants founded the Ashkenazi Jewish community. The community survived under Charlemagne, but suffered during the Crusades.

  5. 03.01.2020 · Here are a comprehensive collection of short study notes and interactive revision resources for the Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-1939 (Option 31) unit of the Edexcel GCSE History course. RECOMMENDED REVISION GUIDE FOR EDEXCEL GCSE HISTORY: WEIMAR & NAZI GERMANY (1918-39) We recommend that students taking Edexcel GCSE History: Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-1939 use the following revision guide ...

  6. After Germany failed to pay France an installment of reparations on time in late 1922, French and Belgian troops occupied the Ruhr valley, Germany's main industrial region, in January 1923. Reparations were to be paid in goods, such as coal , and the occupation was supposed to ensure reparations payments.

  7. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › GermanyGermany - Wikipedia

    The English word Germany derives from the Latin Germania, which came into use after Julius Caesar adopted it for the peoples east of the Rhine. The German term Deutschland, originally diutisciu land ('the German lands') is derived from deutsch (cf. Dutch), descended from Old High German diutisc 'of the people' (from diot or diota 'people'), originally used to distinguish the language of the ...